Check out those buns!

Phew! That was hardwork but a lovely weekend. We got up at a ‘normal’ time of day, pottered about the house and got the 10ish train into town. Walked from:

  • Waterloo to Covent Garden
  • Covent Garden to British Museum
  • British Museum to London Bridge (hotel)
  • London Bridge to Tate Modern
  • Tate Modern to Waterloo, hopped in a taxi to Tate Britain

After going round the gallery, we got back in a taxi to Waterloo and home. Our butts felt the burn, as did our calves the following morning, but spending the weekend nattering, being cultured and enjoying each other’s company was just what we needed after a long week at work, the move, life, the universe and everything.

We split a bottle of vintage champagne over dinner to celebrate both birthdays and Valentine’s, the most expensive bottle I’ve ever brought, but it was worth every penny. And yes, I kept the cork.

TB was impressed by the Reading Room at the British Museum, who can forget the first time they go into it, the hair stands up on the back of your neck, it is so stunning. But the museum was full to bursting with school trips and children whose parents obviously have no idea how to control them. Is it me or do you not tend to run around priceless artifacts? I know that had I or my brother behaved like that we would have had the telling off of our lives and been taken home. Why are people so afraid to tell their children ‘No’ and mean it? (I will get off my soap-box on this one, as it is a whole other posting and a perennial bug-bear of mine.)

We also enjoyed the Hogarth exhibition and brought the catalogue. I am in two minds as to go again, the layout was much better than normal, although there were lots of people, you could still stand right in front of the pictures if you waited for a natural pause. I was left in the 1st room by TB, as he wanted to wander at his own pace (something we both enjoy about mooching in museums with each other), he told me to take my time, so 3/4 of an hour later I came out, found him in the shop with an enormous grin on my face. It truly offers a comprehensive and compassionate study of all his work. I cannot recommend it enough.

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